MotherBaby Network

advocacy and commentary with a focus on Lane County, Oregon

Tag Archives: OHP

Stepping Toward A Baby-Friendlier Oregon

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The Breastfeeding Coalition of Oregon under the direction of Amelia Psmythe recently hosted its sold-out 5th annual two-day statewide conference – Stepping Toward A Baby-Friendlier Oregon. Supporters who made the conference possible include Oregon WIC, Oregon Public Health Institute, Hygeia, Limerick, and Medical International.

Anyone wanting to know what Oregon’s many infant-feeding stakeholder groups are up to should make a habit of attending. While there is still so much to be done to protect and promote breastfeeding, the following downloadable synopsis of conference presentations will give you a quick bird’s eye view of the excellent and diverse work already underway.

Oregon is fortunate to have an extraordinarily talented cadre of savvy, skilled and committed advocates for quality care. Throughout the state, these advocates promote and protect women’s health, well being and basic human rights spanning the entire arc of their reproductive lives whether at home, in the community, in the health care system, in the economy or as “subjects” of scientific research and inquiry. The BCO annual conference is a good opportunity to check in and rally for the difficult but critical work ahead to achieve breastfeeding’s full-spectrum benefits for the entire population.

Framing the discussion…Presentations and discussion were conceived of and organized to align with the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding (SGCTA). The SGCTA is a federal tool to direct policy, fund activities and align stakeholders around important objectives outlined in Healthy People 2020. Federal, state and local grants and staffing resources are made available and prioritized based on alignment with SGCTA objectives.

The SGCTA to Support Breastfeeding is a ground-breaking document because it is a clear departure  from previous policy and political frameworks that define breastfeeding as an individual responsibility or lifestyle choice beyond the concern, responsibility and reach of government focus. Finally, breastfeeding behaviors and outcomes have been re-defined as the product of cultural norms and structures at all levels of society. Accordingly, public health workers, researchers, employers, health care systems, communities and families are “called to action” to better and more effectively support mothers and babies to breastfeed.

Presentation Synopses. Following is a list of presentations. It gives a wide-angle view of how individuals and institutions are aligning Oregon with the SGCTA. Click here for a version of this post that also includes a synopsis of each presentation.

The Role of Consumer Advocacy in Increasing E-B Infant Feeding Practices
Katharine Gallagher, MPP. Consumer advocate, blogger and independent childbirth educator.
slides
, talk

Let’s Talk! Breastfeeding Education Series Tear Sheet Project
Rachel Martinez, BA, IBCLC, RLC. New Member Training Coordinator at Nursing Mothers Counsel of Oregon, and Legacy Emmanuel Hospital lactation consultant.

The Oregon Black Women’s Birth Survey
Shafia Monroe, Midwife. Founder of the International Center for Traditional Childbearing

Supporting Families the Whole Way: Continuity Care Model
Debbie Alba, RN, IBCLC. Nurse and Lactation Consultant at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, currently serving as Western Region Steering Committee Chair

Angie Chisholm, CNM. Certified Nurse Midwife at Samaritan OB/GYN in Corvallis, with a long interest in lactation and evidence-based care.

Oregon WIC Peer Counseling: A Public Health Approach
Kelly Sibley, MPH, RD, IBCLC. Nutrition Consultant and Breastfeeding Coordinator with the Oregon State WIC Program. Coordinates WIC BF peer counselors.

Engaging Community Partners in Breastfeeding Support
Helen Bellanca, MD, MPH. Family physician who has worked with health policy and advocacy for four years, leading insurance collaborative and child care survey.

Lessons Learned on the Way to Baby-Friendly: Providence Newberg
Joanne Ransom, RN, IBCLC. Labor & delivery nurse and lactation consultant at Providence Newberg, former Vice-Chair of Northwest Mothers Milk Bank, new OEBIN co-lead

Redesignation with Baby-Friendly: Strategies for Success
Michelle Stevenson, RN. Perinatal Nurse and former La Leche League Leader, led two CA hospitals to Baby-Friendly designation, and now manages the Women and Newborn Care and Nursery at Kaiser Sunnyside Hospital.

Eliminating Elective Deliveries Prior to 39 Weeks Gestation: OR Challenge
Joanne Rogovoy, Executive Director of the Oregon March of Dimes, and leader of the workgroup that banned early c-sections on Portland area hospitals.

Donor human milk & Northwest Mothers Milk Bank
June Winfield, Board Chair / Director

Breaks for Nursing Mothers are Federally “Reasonable”
Amelia Psmythe, Director of the Breastfeeding Coalition of Oregon and West Region Coalition Representative to the United States Breastfeeding Committee.

Nursing Mothers Counsel Workplace Lactation Support Program
Marion Rice, Ed.D. 25 year educator, currently leads the Nursing Mothers Counsel of Oregon Worksite Lactation Support Program

What Do Women Really Want? A 21st Century Mother’s Movement
Andrea Paluso, MSW, MPH. Co-founder of Family Forward Oregon, The Mother PAC, and recent graduate of the Emerge Oregon legislative mentoring program.

Breastfeeding Outcomes in Women with a Prior History of Cesarean Section
Cathy Emeis, PhD, CNM. A nurse-midwife and researcher at OHSU, Cathy’s current research examines the impact of birth interventions and c-section on breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding Coalition of Oregon: Northwest Edge of the Wave of Change
Amelia Psmythe, Director of the Breastfeeding Coalition of Oregon and West Region Coalition Representative to the United States Breastfeeding Committee

US Breastfeeding Committee Annual Report
Robin Stanton, MA, RD, LD. USBC Past-Chair and Nutrition Consultant with OR Department of Human Services, Public Health Division

Collaboration for Collective Impact
Amelia Psmythe and Robin Stanton, MA, RD, LD

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Oregon Health Plan applications should be expedited for pregnant women

Low-income pregnant women in Oregon experience too many delays in completing the Oregon Health Plan application process. These delays run counter to Department of Human Services policy requiring applications by pregnant women be expedited and processed within two business days. DHS branches must have or develop a specific process for expediting applications made by pregnant women.

Inadequate prenatal care is linked to increased risk for low birth weight, prematurity and infant and maternal mortality. Lane County fetal-infant mortality data for the period of July 2007 to June 2010 shows than 34% of affected families accessed prenatal care after the first trimester.

In an effort to minimize delays stemming from policy non-compliance, DHS has sent a policy transmittal to case workers and eligibility workers who process OHP applications. The transmittal reiterates and clarifies existing policy that until now has had variable degrees of implementation. Women can verify pregnancy with an informal note from a medical clinic or crisis center. Neither a note from a doctor, nor an ultrasound are required – though an ultrasound may be used for verification purposes.

“Emergent medical needs, and those who are pregnant, have priority when processing applications for medical. They do not need to disclose the basis of their emergent need. The application should be pended, approved or denied by the eligibility worker within one business day whenever possible.” – DHS transmittal

Pregnant women can print and bring this transmittal with them when applying for OHP. Regardless of a woman’s plans for her pregnancy, she is entitled to have her application expedited. If a woman planning to terminate her pregnancy encounters delays, this should be reported to the Network for Reproductive Options (NRO).

Special thanks to Representative Mitch Greenlick for providing legislative intern Jessica Matthews, MPH, the opportunity to work on this issue. Matthews worked with the Oregon Health Authority to clarify and communicate the correct policy. Thanks, too, to Bayla Ostrach for sharing the data from her master’s thesis that found low-income pregnant women in Oregon experience notable delays in the OHP application process.

Wider awareness of this policy can help to further eliminate bureaucratic barriers to pregnant women seeking access to care – spread the word. If you have a website or blog, post the DHS transmittal.

Mandatory Licensure for Midwives?

Oregon State Represenative Mitch Greenlick has introduced House Bill 2380 to the Health Care Committee. 2380 requires all direct-entry midwives in the state to become licensed providers. If passed, this bill would replace Oregon’s voluntary licensure program for direct-entry midwifery. Bill 2380 contains an emergency clause making it effective upon signature by the Governor meaning it is not subject to referendum.

Bill 2380 would limit the freedom pregnant women in Oregon currently enjoy in selecting a provider. The options include OB/GYNs, Certified-Nurse Midwives, Licensed-Direct Entry Midwives and Direct Entry Midwives. Depending on the choice of provider, women birth at home, in birth centers and in hospitals. Under 2380, Oregonians would lose the legal right to be attended by a direct-entry midwife. These midwives practice independently of constraints imposed by the Oregon Health Licensing Agency.

Need help sorting out Midwifery Credentials and Terms? Read this Guide.

Among direct-entry midwives in Oregon, some 60 are voluntarily licensed by OHLA. Licensed direct-entry midwives practice within the scope defined by administrative rules that the Board of Direct Entry Midwifery develops. New licensure rules were recently adopted. Licensure entitles LDMs to carry legend drugs and devices and to bill insurers for reimbursement. OHP, PEBB and some private insurers reimburse.

Direct-entry midwives forego licensure for many reasons. Foremost is preserving independence in practice. Because they are not constrained by licensure, they may serve women that LDMs cannot. Women select independent midwives for many reasons including the desire to give birth in an environment free of state regulation.

A consumer-led effort is surfacing in the form of Oregon Birth Rites. This website encourages Oregonians to contact Rep. Greenlick and their own representatives to discourage moving this bill any further.

Greenlick also introduces bill forbidding bike transport for kids under six

Representative Greenlick also introduced House Bill 2228. This bill seeks to prohibit the carrying of children six years or younger on the back of a bike or in a trailer. The bill is causing an outcry.

According to BikePortland.org blogger Jonathon Maus, Rep. Greenlick introduced the legislation before identifying a strong body of supporting evidence. Maus characterizes Greenlick’s approach as proposing legislation to stimulate public debate. In the comments field for Maus’ post, Representative Ben Cannon weighs in:

“I take Mitch at his word that he introduced the bill in order to “start a conversation” about bicycle safety. It might seem strange, but this is the way the process often works: a legislator gets an idea, drafts a bill, introduces it, gets feedback, and then decides whether to try to proceed, perhaps with amendments, or whether to let it die. Remember that a bill has to pass at least two committees, plus the House and the Senate, and be signed by the Governor, in order to become law. This proposal is a long way from that. “

If the premature introduction of a bill is the best way for Oregon’s legislators to generate information about an idea’s potential to increase the public good, MotherBaby Network proposes and supports addressing this gap in non-partisan legislative analysis in the coming session.

Better Legislative Leadership Needed

In the spirit of protecting the public, MotherBaby Network looks forward to the day when a state legislator will advance legislation with an emergency clause to recognize and address issues that affect the large majority of childbearing Oregonians. Issues ripe for leadership include the lack of transparency in hospital and provider rates for induction, far-too-high rates of cesarean section as well as the paucity of facility-level information regarding the practice of evidence-based infant feeding. (The Surgeon General recently issued a Call to Action to address barriers to breastfeeding.) There is an abundance of easily accessible and relevant research to support legislative leadership on these issues.

Much needs to be done to reduce non-medically indicated inductions, cesarean section and infant supplementation. These issues are just waiting for an elected leader with the courage and fortitude to work through the barriers separating women and families from excellent motherbaby outcomes before, during and after birth. Oregon’s elected leaders would serve the greater good by building on our current system of respect for individual freedom. We need legislation that increases transparency within the healthcare system that most women are actually using. This kind of governance would dramatically address an absence of necessary information and empower consumers of maternity care to make informed decisions.

Let’s take the plunge and go where the biggest, toughest problems reside — the hospital-based system. Let’s make that better. The overwhelming majority of Oregonians receive their care in hospitals. Encouraging more transparency within this model of care would have broad and deep positive impact on the lives of Oregonians.

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Latest on Midwifery Board rules / Shout Out to Midwifery Supporters

Latest development in OARS

The Oregon Board of Direct Entry Midwifery is near the end of a yearlong process of revising the Oregon Administrative Rules (draft rules) that govern licensed direct-entry midwives (LDMs). With a few exceptions, LDMs are the sole providers of home birth services in Oregon. In September, draft rules developed by the “Rules Advisory Committee” received seven-to-one support from the Midwifery Board. (Read earlier post and reference the Guide to Midwifery Credentials and Terms in Oregon)

Following a subsequent month of written public comments and an October 28 public hearing, the Oregon Health Licensing Agency (OHLA) —oversight agency for the Midwifery Board— extended the written public comment period by 30 days. OHLA cites the “high volume of public comment and diverse nature of topics” for the extension.

Consumers underrepresented at public hearing

Advocates for choice in maternity care have expressed concern over so few consumers and supporters of LDM care attending the hearing. Consumer Minna Pavulans offered the only such perspective. (Read a consensus letter Pavulans helped draft earlier this year.) The small showing contrasts with a large Spring 2010 convergence in Salem of the many women, partners and babies registering demands for continued access to LDMs.

In contrast, LDM opponents were in high attendance at the recent public hearing, achieving the strategic benefit of over-representation for their views. Requests included altering the draft rules to forbid LDMs from serving women with the following kinds of pregnancies:

  • Vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC)
  • Breech
  • Twin.

The proposed draft rules permit LDMs to serve women with most of these kinds of pregnancies. This is a major victory for maternity choice advocates and likely an choice in care unique to Oregon. LDM opponents also asked that practicing LDMs be required to secure $1 million liability insurance. Obtaining this level of coverage is almost certainly impossible.

Within the licensed direct-entry midwifery community, a lack of basic accord on the draft rules exists. Discerning if the LDM community generally views the rules as mostly okay with a few exceptions or mostly unacceptable is difficult. In contrast to LDM opponents, it is proving hard for this constituency to convey a consistent, strong message to the Midwifery Board.

Ironically, as midwives debate the impact of the draft rules on choice in maternity care, the position of individuals and groups pushing for additional restrictions improves. For good or bad, boards respond most to constituencies with clear and consistently conveyed demands.

What does freedom of choice mean in the context of licensure?

In Oregon, direct-entry midwives may practice with or without a license. Women select licensed or unlicensed direct-entry midwives for numerous reasons. Three common reasons for selecting a licensed midwife include:

  • Insurance reimbursement. Some health insurance plans, including that of the Oregon Public Employee Benefit Board and Oregon Health Plan, reimburse for LDM care.
  • Professional standards. To gain licensure, midwives demonstrate evidence of core competencies and pass written exams.
  • Legend Drugs and Devices. LDMs legally carry and administer anti-hemorrhagics, medical oxygen, IV fluids, anaphylactic treatment and local anesthetics among other items.

In selecting a LDM, a woman opts into a model of care in which state-endorsed rules govern the terms of licensure. Rules for who midwives may serve, when additional consultations are required and consumer recourse in the event of a complaint are just a few of the many areas in which the midwife-client relationship is shaped by codified guidelines.

However a woman defines the benefits of licensed direct-entry midwifery, they are gained in the context of the rules of licensure. Rules, by their very nature, infer limits. The Midwifery Board’s most pressing task right now is to determine what those limits on scope of practice should be and how to articulate them in the new set of rules.

Support for imperfection?

Are the draft rules perfect? Must they be to garner general consumer support? The answer is “no” on both accounts.

By virtue of having been drafted by a group of individuals —each with a unique set of convictions, beliefs and biases— the rules are necessarily imperfect. This is not the same as saying they are unworthy of support. Another litmus test is to assess to what extent the divergent views have been transparently negotiated with evidence-based findings setting the standard for debate.

Consumers can also assess their personal level of support or opposition for the draft rules by asking two questions:

  1. Are the flaws fundamental enough to preclude one’s overall support?
  2. Is a better outcome possible given current political realities?

Consumers, make your thoughts known

Having dominated the public hearing, LDM opponents have everything to gain by redoubling their efforts. Despite a poor showing at the public hearing, it’s not too late for consumer feedback to stabilize what is turning out to be an unpredictable conclusion to a yearlong revision. Consumer participation earlier in the process is credited for strengthening the position of advocates for choice in maternity care. To the degree that the rules protect those choices, consumers deserve credit. To get the job done, more letters (yes, another letter!) are needed to empower the Midwifery Board to resist yielding to extreme positions.

Supporters (and opponents) of the LDM model of care have through Sunday, November 28 at 5pm to weigh in. Email or mail your letter here:

Samie Patnode, Policy Analyst
Oregon Health Licensing Agency

700 Summer St NE, Suite 320
Salem, OR 97301-1287
samie.patnode@state.or.us
Work: (503) 373-1917
Fax: (503) 585-9114

Send it to your elected representatives and post it on your personal Facebook pages. Send it to Oregon Midwifery Council at info@oregonmidwiferycouncil.org.

Invite partners, family and friends who support choice in maternity care to write letters, too. Share your letter with them to help them get started. Offer to send it in for them.

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