MotherBaby Network

advocacy and commentary with a focus on Lane County, Oregon

Tag Archives: Rep. Lew Frederick

Leg Update for MotherBaby Bills in Oregon

Two of three motherbaby-oriented bills signed into law so far…

Midwifery Bill

HB 2380 passed the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday and now goes to the Senate floor. This bill creates a majority of licensed direct-entry midwives on the Oregon Board of Direct Entry Midwives, establishes protected peer review for licensed midwives, alters birth statistic collections to accurately record midwife-attended births (including transports), exempts receiving physicians from liability for injuries caused by a transporting midwife and distinguish outcomes between licensed direct-entry midwives and direct-entry midwives who are not licensed. 2380 goes a long way toward improving maternal health and birth outcomes through the provision of accurate statistics.

According to the Oregon Midwifery Council (a bill supporter), the Oregon Medical Association and Oregon Health & Sciences University support 2380.

The current legislative session is drawing to a close. Bill supporters are encouraged to contact their representatives  in the Senate to encourage a “yes” vote.

Increased Awareness for Maternal Mental Health Illness

On June 2nd, Governor Kitzhaber signed HB 2235 into law, creating the Maternal Mental Health Patient and Provider Education Program within the Oregon Health Authority. This program will produce and provide health-care providers with materials and training about maternal mental health illness during pregnancy and within one year following birth. Rep. Carolyn Tomei (D-Milwaukie) sponsored the bill. Among key supporters and advocates for HB 2235 was Lane County’s Eugene-based WellMama, Inc.’s executive director Amy-Rose White.

24 percent of Oregon’s new mothers self-report depression during and/or after pregnancy. Maternal mental health illness can include depression, anxiety, inability and disinterest in sleeping and eating, and overpowering feelings of failure, despair and inadequacy. While effective screening and treatment exist, the vast majority of affected women are never diagnosed or connected with services.

HB 2235 originally included funding for a provider training program and required that providers make educational material available to pregnant women. The Lund Report reports that medical groups including the Oregon Medical Association and the Oregon Pediatric Society objected to mandatory provision of information. Funding was also stripped and provision of educational materials is now optional. Maternal health advocates envision future legislation to make maternal mental health screening part of the standard of care for pregnant women.

Read coverage in The Statesman Journal and The Lund Report.

Impact of Doulas in Improving Maternal Health

Earlier this month, HB 3311 was signed into law. Under the new law, the Oregon Health Authority will investigate how doulas (birth companions) improve birth outcomes for women at disproportionate risk for poor birth outcomes. Rep. Tina Kotek (D-N and NE Portland) and Rep. Lew Frederick (D-NE Portland) sponsored the bill. Portland-based International Center for Traditional Childbearing played a critical role in the introduction of the bill.

Doulas are labor companions who provide emotional, non-medical support associated with positive outcomes and all-too-frequently absent from a laboring woman’s side. Doulas are a well documented evidence based and non-medical intervention with a proven track record for positively influencing the social, physical and emotional outcomes of the perinatal period.

According to The Lund Report, Oregon’s infant mortality rate among African Americans is 9.4 per thousand, compared with 5.5 per thousand in the Caucasian population. The Urban League of Portland reports African-American babies are roughly twice as likely as white babies to be born with a low birth weight. Lane County’s  disturbingly high rate of fetal-infant mortality highlights the need to focus on disparities and gaps in care.

Read coverage in The Lund Report.

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